Making the
impossible

possible

We humans are pretty remarkable creatures — redirecting the flow of mighty rivers, exploring the building blocks of our own genetic material, leaving the boundaries of our planet behind — to us, limitations are more like dares. Throughout history, ambitous, creative people have turned challenges into opportunities and impossible situations into breakthroughs.

At Northwell Health, we’re committed to that pioneering spirit. Caregivers, researchers and professionals across our organization are working to eliminate the word impossible from health care’s vocabulary. On the pages that follow, we share remarkable innovations that weren’t possible just a few years ago, and small steps that will be the foundation for tomorrow’s unbelievable technologies.

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The custom-fitted 3D-printed prosthetic leg that permits an amputee to go straight from land into the water and back was spearheaded by Northwell Health.

A marine gets back in the swim

Marine Corporal Dan Lasko was sworn into the United States Marine Corps on the morning of September 11, 2001. Three years later, as he explains it, “I was in Afghanistan, riding in a convoy, when my armored vehicle crossed over a trip-wire, detonating an IED (improvised explosive device). I took the brunt of the explosion, severely injuring my foot. After several surgeries, my leg was amputated below the knee.”

Now, an active, below-the-knee amputee who plays competitive sports, Dan was eager to be fitted for an amphibious prosthetic that could help him swim with his kids – Luke, 6, and Ben, 2. The custom-fitted, 3D-printed prosthetic leg that permits an amputee to go straight from land into the water and back was spearheaded by Northwell Health, which worked with two Long Island-based firms — a prosthetic design firm and a commercial-grade 3D-manufacturing company — to solve a problem for so many amputees.

“We made something that didn’t exist yet and solved a specific problem in a very spectacular way. My hope is that this device creates unforeseen opportunities for amputees everywhere” said Northwell Health researcher Todd Goldstein, PhD, who designed and developed the new amphibious prosthetic, and worked closely with Mr. Lasko for the custom fit that put the former Marine back in the swim, realizing a dream with his two boys.

Re-imagining ambulatory surgery

In an effort to re-imagine ambulatory surgical services and the overall patient experience, Northwell Health is poised to open up to 30 outpatient surgery centers over the next several years through joint ventures with physician groups and private investors.

“It is part of a broad-based strategy,” Rob Scoskie, managing director of Northwell Ventures, explained of the 10 joint ventures Northwell Health has already undertaken as of spring 2017.

As part of its expansion plans, Northwell Health is building two ambulatory surgery centers in partnership with physicians in Manhattan, including Greenwich Village and in Midtown on Manhattan’s West Side. The health system also has joint ventures with Access Clinical Partners to open up to 50 Northwell GoHealth Urgent Care Centers (35 have already opened), with Davita Kidney Care to open and operate 14 dialysis centers, and with radiation oncology providers and numerous other partners. “We’re contemplating activity in other areas like sleep centers and sleep labs and radiology services,” Mr. Scoskie said. “It’s more convenient for patients to receive these services outside the traditional hospital setting and Northwell’s involvement ensures quality.”

“We made something that didn’t exist yet and solved a specific problem in a very spectacular way. My hope is that this device creates unforeseen opportunities for amputees everywhere” said Northwell Health researcher Todd Goldstein, PhD, who designed and developed the new amphibious prosthetic, and worked closely with Mr. Lasko for the custom fit that put the former Marine back in the swim, realizing a dream with his two boys.

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As part of its expansion plans, Northwell Health is building two ambulatory surgery centers in partnership with physicians in Manhattan, including Greenwich Village and in Midtown on Manhattan’s West Side.

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On an average day in the US:

  • More than 650,000 opioid prescriptions dispensed
  • 3,900 people initiate nonmedical use ofprescription opioids
  • 580 people initiate heroin use
  • 78 people die from an opioid-related overdose

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services

Combating opiod addiction

The overuse and misuse of prescription opioids has created a crisis in communities across the United States. To address the growing epidemic in our communities, Northwell Health has developed system-wide strategies to create standard practices for prescribing pain medications, educating clinicians and patients about the dangers of opioids, and promoting the increased use of pain management alternatives, screening, intervention and community outreach.

More than 110,000 New Yorkers receive treatment for addiction on any given day, according to the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services, which monitors nearly 1,600 prevention, treatment and recovery programs. Last year, Northwell facilities alone admitted 6,240 patients for substance abuse treatment. The numbers are alarming and they do not even take into account those who seek or receive outpatient services.

“No other health system has a task force like this,” said Jay Enden, MD, medical director for the health system’s Eastern Region, who leads the Northwell team looking at the multi-faceted problem. “It’s a massive undertaking, and a great example of how we differentiate ourselves from other health care providers.”

“We made something that didn’t exist yet and solved a specific problem in a very spectacular way. My hope is that this device creates unforeseen opportunities for amputees everywhere” said Northwell Health researcher Todd Goldstein, PhD, who designed and developed the new amphibious prosthetic, and worked closely with Mr. Lasko for the custom fit that put the former Marine back in the swim, realizing a dream with his two boys.

First-year med students as EMTs

When it comes to “making the impossible possible,” the idea of Northwell creating its own medical and nursing schools was considered a bit of a pipe dream when it was first proposed more than a decade ago. At the time, New York State had not opened a new allopathic medical school in 40 years. But in dramatic fashion, Hofstra University and the health system quickly negotiated an agreement in 2008 to establish a medical school, received preliminary accreditation in 2010 and welcomed its first class in 2011. Since then, 163 students have graduated and the school is now at full capacity with 400 diverse students.

How does it compare to others? According to the 2018 US News & World Report’s “Best Graduate Schools,” Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine is already on par with leading institutions nationwide, tying for 55th nationwide in the area of primary care and 71st in research there are 141 allopathic medical schools in the US.

Meanwhile, the Hofstra Northwell School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies opened in September 2015 and will graduate its first class of 28 students in May 2018.

Among the many defining features of the School of Medicine curriculum, incoming students begin training as emergency medical technicians (EMTs) within days of their arrival, working shifts on Northwell ambulances and responding to 911 calls.

As part of their immersion in the world of emergency medicine, new students spend a day at the Fire Department of New York Training Academy on Randall’s Island to participate in drills mimicking such casualty incidents as a subway catastrophe, bus bombing, car accident and a terrorist incident on a ship. Each situation incorporates the sights and sounds of a real-life disaster, complete with smoke, darkness, fire, sirens, screams and chaotic noise pumped into the scene.

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“All scenarios are choreographed to test a participant’s ability to employ emergency skills and work under pressure,” said Thomas Kwiatkowski, MD, the medical school’s assistant dean for simulation and professor of emergency medicine.

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The goal is to develop and commercialize applications for diagnostic and therapeutic solutions to treat injury and a wide range of acute and chronic diseases.

The Science of disruption

“Accidents will happen,” Elvis Costello sang. But when he did, he likely didn’t imagine that an “accident” in a scientist’s lab could change an entire industry, especially if it wasn’t part of some superhero movie. But in the real world, fact is stranger than fiction, and that’s exactly what happened.

In 1998, in Dr. Kevin Tracey’s lab, an important accident occurred that   no screenwriter could have foreseen. “We were working on a molecule to block inflammation,” recalls Dr. Tracey, president of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. “We put the anti-inflammatory molecule

into the brains of mice and rats, and found that it blocked inflammation, just as we expected. The “accident” was that the same drug also   blocked inflammation in the body of the animal. The brain was turning off inflammation in the spleen and liver by sending anti-inflammatory signals in the nerves, an unexpected discovery that was the beginning of bioelectronic medicine.”

That happy accident opened the floodgates to a disruption in health care, where many are betting that after their safety and efficacy are ensured, bio-electronic devices will benefit millions of patients in ways we could never imagine: eliminating the necessity for certain drugs, restoring functionality to patients suffering from inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, Crohn’s disease and lupus, and providing more complete recovery from injuries, among other  uses.

Northwell Health’s Feinstein Institute is at the center of this disruption and is shaping the future of health care. Through the unwavering  generosity

of the Institute’s continuing benefactors Susan and Leonard Feinstein,  and with the assistance of investors, contributors and collaborators that include GE, United Therapeutics and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers at the Feinstein’s Center for Bioelectronic Medicine are on a mission of exploration and discovery, armed with more than $200 million in support. The goal is to develop and commercialize applications for diagnostic and therapeutic solutions to treat injury and a wide range of acute and chronic diseases.

Preventing blood loss during childbirth

Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths worldwide, killing nearly 80,000 women in Africa and Asia, and about 6,000 in the United States each year. Studies show that vagus nerve stimulation in mothers suffering from postpartum hemorrhage may reduce life-threatening bleeding. The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research is partnering with The Global Good Fund (a collaboration between Intellectual Ventures and Bill  Gates to invent technology that improves life in developing countries) and Sanguistat, Inc. (a medical device company) on clinical trials of a device called the neural tourniquet, which evaluates the efficacy of bioelectronic medicine in treating blood loss associated with postpartum hemorrhage. Other applications of the neural tourniquet include use for patients suffering traumatic injury and limiting blood loss for soldiers on the battlefield.

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Studies show that vagus nerve stimulation in mothers suffering from postpartum hemorrhage may reduce life-threatening bleeding.

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Lack of access to nutritional food has a significant effect on families’ ability to maintain active, healthy lifestyles – and the prevalence of health disparities within communities. “Food insecurity” may reflect a household’s need to make trade-offs between basic needs, such as housing or medical bills, and purchasing healthy food. This chart shows the number of “food insecure” individuals in Northwell Health’s service area:

County

Food Insecure Individuals

Nassau

85,540

Suffolk

95,540

New York (Manhattan)

243,570

Queens

298,250

Richmond (Staten Island)

48,380

Westchester

84,970

Total

856,650

Theres No Quality Without Equity

As the former CEO of Cook County Health & Hospitals System in Chicago, Ram Raju, MD, recalls looking at a map of life expectancy in Chicago. A study showed that on Chicago’s South Side, people could expect to live to age 69. A short distance to the north, life expectancy was 81 years. Dr. Raju, who joined Northwell Health in 2017 as senior vice president and community health investment officer, was baffled by one simple question: why would babies born a few miles apart in the same major American city have such radically different health trajectories?

What has become clear to him and other population health experts is that the same story occurs in communities across the country. The most underprivileged Americans live shorter, less-healthy lives because of a host of social factors, like poverty. The conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live and age, and the wider set of forces that shape the conditions of daily life, all determine how healthy — or unhealthy people will be.

While many have become numb to the reality of health disparities, Northwell Health is taking on the momentous challenge of trying to influence factors that shape the long-term health of the populations we serve. Dr. Raju, Jennifer Mieres, MD, senior vice president of Northwell’s Center for Equity of Care, and the health system’s Office of Population Health Management all recognize that we must adhere to the following principle: there’s no quality without  equity.

In the coming years, Northwell will be evaluating the needs of its most- vulnerable communities, assessing programs that enhance the health system’s ability to respond to those needs and collaborate with community-based organizations to create problem-solving  solutions.

Purple setting on health care infections

Northwell Ventures is helping to bring a new light-based disinfection solution to the health care industry. The new product, developed by a New York-based company called PurpleSun, uses ultraviolet (UV) light to supplement the routine manual application of liquid chemicals used to clean hospital rooms, operating rooms and other patient care areas. PurpleSun’s technology is a modular smart device that safely uses one-click, 90-second UV light to reduce harmful organisms that can cause hospital-acquired infections.

“Each hospital infection poses a risk of serious illness or even death to patients,” said Donna Armellino, RN, NP, vice president of infection prevention at Northwell Health. “At the very least, it can extend their length of hospitalization and exposure to antibiotics that increase the risk for resistant organisms and hard-to-treat infections, plus thousands of dollars in additional expense on unnecessary health care.”

Ms. Armellino says scientific data proves the effectiveness of using   UV rays. “We’re confident PurpleSun’s novel light technology platform can be an integral part of the solution when systematically utilized throughout the health care environment,” she said. “The automated smart devices will set the stage for patient safety through the highest quality in medical light-based disinfection. It can treat rooms and equipment without requiring patients or staff to leave the room.

The ultraviolet light is within the inner panelings of the device and the exterior of the device is the shield that provides protection from exposure to the ultraviolet rays.”

With a list of notable accolades at the state and federal levels, and a global intellectual property portfolio, PurpleSun earned venture backing from Wall Street investors in 2013 leading to new investments from Northwell to fuel the company through its next phases of growth.

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“The automated device will set the stage for patient safety through the highest quality in medical light-based disinfection.”

—Donna Armellino, RN, NP

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The Katz Institute for Women’s Health provides women of all ages with resources to make healthy choices. And the Katz Women’s Hospitals at Long Island Jewish Medical Center and North Shore University Hospital collectively deliver more than 16,000 babies annually. To learn more, go to northwell.edu/katz.

Women and Children First

Continued investments in women’s health and pediatrics have positioned Northwell Health as a primary health destination for women and their families.

At Cohen Children’s Medical Center, the largest provider of pediatric services in New York State, physicians performed the hospital’s first kidney transplant on a 14-year-old boy in 2017 and also opened a kid-friendly diagnostic suite that includes state-of-the-art equipment designed to ease children’s anxiety.

Northwell also recognizes that keeping families healthy requires that we support and empower women to take charge of their own health. Through the Katz Institute for Women’s Health,  Northwell partners with women the primary health care decision-maker in most families to inform, navigate and coordinate access to wellness and prevention programs that include a wide variety of innovative diagnostic and treatment options and enhancements to care. To help expecting mothers, Northwell is teaming up with “The Bump,” a leading pregnancy brand for first-time moms, to offer Planner+, a new interactive feature within the mobile app that provides must-know information and details about each prenatal doctor visit. The all- inclusive mobile app, which offers a platform to schedule and sync doctor’s appointments on iOS calendars, has leveraged its innovative technology to give users access to the experts at Northwell, home to more than 40,000 births each year.

Planner+ prepares expecting moms with a detailed guide to each important prenatal visit throughout her nine months of pregnancy. The guide features appointment-specific information about the visit and what to expect, the most important questions to ask doctors and how to prepare for the appointment.

Leading with robot-assisted surgery

Robotic systems have been playing a vital role in health care for more than a decade, serving as an innovative extension of a surgeon’s hands and eyes, saving lives, improving outcomes and bringing new life into the world. Northwell Health performs more robotic procedures than any other health care provider on the Eastern seaboard, investing in 17 da Vinci robotic surgery systems over the past decade.

The reason is clear, says Jerald Wishner, MD, chief of robotic surgery at Northwell’s Northern Westchester Hospital. “If you ask patients about robotic surgery by saying: ‘Do you want your surgeon to be more precise? Do you want your surgeon to see better?’ They then understand the benefits of robotic surgery. And the answer is always ‘yes.’”

Dr. Wishner recalls one patient with two issues solved by robotic surgery — a young Manhattan attorney who found out she was nine weeks pregnant — and also had colon cancer.

“She had two kids at home and did not want to give up her pregnancy,” he recalled. “I told her we could help. She went to three cancer programs in Manhattan — really doing her research. There was a large tumor right behind the uterus. It was a complicated case and she came back to us because she wanted us to do the surgery. Robotics made it safer. There is less pain and less pain medication, which are advantages for someone who is pregnant. We removed her tumor and she gave birth to a healthy baby.”

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Northwell Health performs more robotic procedures than any other health care provider on the Eastern seaboard, investing in 17 da Vinci robotic surgery systems over the past decade.

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Imaging captures imagination at Cohen Children’s Medical Center

Thanks to a $10 million commitment from the Children’s Medical Fund of New York (CMF), young patients at Cohen Children’s Medical Center can now undergo testing in a suite designed with them in mind, from the immersive space motif to the use of advanced 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines specifically dedicated to children.

“We are very proud to have funded the Children’s Medical Fund Center for Diagnostic Studies at Cohen Children’s Medical Center,” said David Blumenfeld, CMF’s chairman. “We knew that the CMF Center would be tremendously important to patients and families, and we could not be more pleased to help Cohen Children’s offer state-of-the-art diagnostic services.”

The Children’s Medical Fund Center for Diagnostic Studies, located in the new pavilion at Cohen Children’s, was conceived to make the ordeal of testing a unique and wondrous experience instead of an anxiety-ridden event. The NASA-themed suite features two MRI machines along with special goggles so children can watch movies during the examination. There’s also a mock scanner to help child life specialists prepare young patients before an exam and quell any apprehension.

This transformational gift is the latest of many from a longstanding partnership with Children’s Medical Fund, a stalwart supporter of pediatric care at Northwell Health for 50 years. Cohen Children’s anticipates imaging more than 4,500 children each year.

“This kind of financial support helps us build on our foundation of excellent pediatric care,” said Charles Schleien, MD, executive director at Cohen Children’s. “The suite is designed exclusively for children and is the latest step in our ongoing commitment to providing the best care possible for children.”

From supermarket to superb cancer center

“Not only does cancer take a toll on you physically, but so do your doctor appointments and necessary labs,” said Suzette Rodriguez of West Babylon. “Add in a long commute and you’re mentally and physically exhausted.” Ms. Rodriguez knows this firsthand, having commuted to Northwell’s Monter Cancer Center in Lake Success for her surgery and chemotherapy treatments.

Thanks to the opening of the Imbert Cancer Center in Bay Shore in October 2016, Suffolk County residents like Ms. Rodriguez can now receive comprehensive cancer care close to home. The $46.5 million, 46,000-square-foot facility brings integrated services — including medical oncology, radiation therapy, interventional radiology, surgical oncology, diagnostic imaging, clinical trials and support services — all under one roof.

The transformed former King Kullen supermarket was strategically designed to evoke its waterfront community, with comfortable interiors and soothing colors that invite patients to relax and be refreshed while they heal. Named for Bay Shore residents and Northwell Health supporters Susan and Richard Imbert, the center links patients to all the resources, physicians and services of Northwell Health through our high-tech electronic medical records.

“Patients can access the very best in cancer care close to their homes and their other treating physicians, spend less time driving to appointments and focus more of their energy on healing and recovery,” said George Raptis, MD, senior vice president of Northwell Health Cancer Services. “We believe this is the best model not only for total cancer care but also total patient care.”

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A soothing, seaside theme is present throughout the new Imbert Cancer Center in Bay Shore. Inset: Rick and Susan Imbert at the opening of the new center.

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“With implementation throughout our hospitals, Northwell’s sepsis-related mortalities have dropped by nearly 60 percent.”                      —Martin Doerfler, MD

Preventing and treating sepsis

Northwell Health, a leader in the fight against sepsis, earned a Sepsis Alliance Heroes Award in 2016 for raising awareness and leading clinical efforts that have saved thousands of lives.

“We had to increase awareness among clinicians and the general public on how to recognize sepsis so it could be stopped. We also needed to work on a strategy to shorten diagnosis time and time to treatment,” said Martin Doerfler, MD, Northwell’s senior vice president of clinical strategy and development and associate chief medical officer. Sepsis had long been considered an ICU [intensive care unit] disease, Dr. Doerfler said, but there was an opportunity to change that thinking. “Those first three hours are critical,” he explained. “We needed to look at how we could cut periods of time out of this process.” That’s because when it comes to sepsis, time isn’t money; time is life.

A life-threatening condition that begins with the immune system’s over-reaction to an infection, sepsis causes widespread inflammation that cascades into multiple organ failures. It accounts for hundreds of thousands of deaths in the US annually.

“We developed a protocol that included early administration of fluids and antibiotics. With implementation throughout our hospitals, Northwell’s sepsis-related mortalities have dropped by nearly 60 percent,” Dr. Doerfler said. Strategic partnerships with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and collaborations with physicians from some of the country’s most-innovative health systems were essential in creating the protocol and systematic structure for improvement, he added.

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Right care. Right time. Right place

When it comes to connecting with patients, nothing can match the benefits of personal, face-to-face interactions. But giving clinicians the ability to check on their patients or institute life-saving care around the clock is a powerful clinical tool that is becoming an increasingly important component of health care delivery.

Northwell Health already has numerous telehealth applications in place, most notably electronic intensive care units (eICU) that augment on-site critical care by remotely monitoring the vital signs of ICU patients at seven hospitals and eight ICUs across the health system. Another life-saving initiative, Northwell’s telestroke program, enables board- certified stroke neurologists to rapidly evaluate stroke victims and assist emergency medicine teams in treating patients upon their hospital arrival. In addition, patients presenting at hospital emergency departments with a psychiatric crisis are connected remotely 24/7 with board-certified psychiatrists. In keeping with the growing focus on home-based services, Northwell provides telemonitoring services for homecare patients, using a tablet-based system that pairs with Bluetooth devices to deliver vital sign and symptom data to clinicians anywhere, anytime.

To augment its delivery of remote medical care, Northwell is partnering with Avizia, a Virginia-based telehealth company, to expand the depth and reach of its telehealth services. The health system is working with Avizia to align the telehealth infrastructure for its 21 hospitals and more than 550 outpatient centers throughout the New York metro area, including physician offices, imaging center laboratories and other Northwell services. The goal? Provide patients with the right care at the right time and place.

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“The partnership allows us to develop a robust, direct-to- consumer platform that will provide care to those we serve within their homes and businesses for a wide-range of conditions”

The heart of innovation

The new Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital at North Shore University Hospital unites the cardiac expertise of North Shore University Hospital (NSUH) and Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Medical Center in one patient-friendly location. Patients now experience the clinical advantages and expertise of one of New York State’s largest and most consistently recognized cardiovascular surgery and interventional cardiology programs in the newly dedicated hospital-within-a-hospital, which includes a staff of more than 700 surgeons, cardiologists, nurses and other specialists.

“Unlike other cardiac programs in the region, we accept any patient at any time, without regard to the severity of illness or socio-economic level,” explained Alan Hartman, MD, Northwell Health’s executive director and chair of cardiothoracic surgery. “We treat more life-threatening aortic dissections than any other program in the tri-state region and achieve superlative ratings for outcomes from the state Department of Health.” Based on 2016 annualized totals, the Heart Hospital performs more than 3,000 cardiac interventions and more than 1,500 cardiothoracic procedures.

“Integrating these programs helps us give patients the best care,” says Barry Kaplan, MD, co-director of the Heart Hospital, chair of cardiology at NSUH and LIJ, and the health system’s executive director of cardiology services. “The objective has always been to deliver high-quality care, while providing patients with experiences they cannot get elsewhere — and we do that better than anyone.”

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“We treat more life-threatening aortic dissections than any other program in the tri-state region and achieve superlative ratings for outcomes from the state Department of Health.”                                   —Alan Hartman, MD

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Top left: Donor and three-time Stanley Cup Winner Clark Gillies stands with his hockey jersey that hangs in the new dedicated pediatric emergency room within Huntington Hospital’s new emergency department. Top right: Huntington Hospital’s new Emergency Department. Bottom left: The Bohlsen family celebrates the opening of Southside’s new emergency department. From left, Michael Bohlsen, Mark L. Claster, John Bohlsen, Hannah Bohlsen (front), Linda Bohlsen, Michael J. Dowling and Kurt Bohlsen. Bottom right: John and Linda Bohlsen stand next to the emergency department vestibule treatment bearing their signatures.

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Outstanding care in the moment you need it

We don’t think much about emergency rooms until we need them. Then we realize how critical they are. “Huntington Hospital has provided essential services to my entire family,” said Charles Reichert. “Everyone deserves to have such a quality medical facility so close to home, and an emergency room is especially critical to so many people.”

Recognizing the importance of emergency services, the Reichert family — along with generous benefactors Patricia Peterson and Stanley Gale and Clark Gillies — provided support to make the new Emergency Department (ED) at Huntington Hospital a reality. “Supporting the community is very important to my family and me,” he said. “We believe strongly in giving back and helping to make the lives of others better.”

The new ED, which more than doubled in size, was one of two state-of-the-art emergency departments that Northwell Health opened in 2016. By increasing the number of treatment areas, adding private results waiting stations, providing dedicated areas for Ob/Gyn, behavioral health, trauma and pediatric patients, and incorporating its own radiology section, the ED can implement a new split-flow model to deliver faster, more-efficient care. Staff triage and assess patients based on the severity of their illness and then route them to the appropriate level of treatment, providing superior care for the 64,000 patients who visit the Huntington ED each year.

Southside Hospital saw its ED triple in size through a $60 million project. A second phase will invest an additional $16 million to renovate the existing ED, providing another 20,000 square feet. When fully completed in November 2017, the Bohlsen Family Emergency Department, named in honor of John and Linda Bohlsen and family, will be capable of handling up to 100,000 emergency visits annually, which should cut waiting times in half, according to John D’Angelo, MD, senior vice president, executive director and chair of Emergency Medicine at Northwell Health.

With intake rooms for rapid assessment, patients arriving at the new Bohlsen Family ED at Southside will be triaged immediately and begin to receive care sooner. A helicopter landing pad was also added to the newly constructed space. “With SkyHealth, our emergency helicopter transport service, trauma patients can be flown here to Southside or other Northwell Health hospitals in a matter of minutes, saving valuable time that can often mean the difference between life and death,” explained Michael Dowling, Northwell’s president and chief executive officer.

Improving lives of patients battling mental illness

Northwell Health’s creation of the Vanguard Research
Group and the signing of its first contract ($29 million) with Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. (OAPI) in 2015 was an important event that set the stage for better clinical research in populations of patients with psychiatric illnesses in North America. Historically, enrolling mental health patients in clinical research trials has proven difficult because of the complexities inherent in this population. However, in its work on behalf of OAPI, Vanguard successfully enrolled 500 patients in a national trial that began in January 2017. The study is testing the efficacy of a once-monthly, injectable version of the schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression drug aripiprazole.

The catalyst for the creation of Vanguard Research was
John Kane, MD, Northwell’s senior vice president of behavioral health, Zucker Hillside Hospital’s chair of psychiatry and the health system’s highest funded researcher. As Northwell’s reputation as a behavioral health leader continues to grow regionally and nationally, the work of Vanguard Research will enable global pharmaceutical and biotech companies to develop new, promising treatments that promise to improve the lives of patients battling mental illness.

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The study is testing the efficacy of a once-monthly, injectable version of the schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression drug aripiprazole.

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Sandra Atlas Bass with (from left), Michael J. Dowling, David E. Bernstein, MD, and Mark L. Claster.

Battling liver disease in the new Sandra Atlas Bass Center

It took 17 years for David Bernstein, MD, chief of hepatology at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center, to see his dream fulfilled. “Our patients [with liver disease] are sick, and they need a destination for their medical treatment,” said Dr. Bernstein. Sandra Atlas Bass made his dream a reality. Her generous support enabled the September 2016 opening of the Sandra Atlas Bass Center for Liver Diseases.

Liver diseases affect 30 million Americans, and the $4.5 million, 10,000-square-foot center allows patients to find the testing, diagnosis and treatment they seek under the care of the skilled physicians in North Shore University Hospital’s Division of Hepatology. Eight exam rooms, a treatment room and a multimedia educational center provide for patient comfort and privacy as well as space for doctors to confer and medical students to learn.

Exciting new drug treatments for liver diseases are emerging that can cure Hepatitis C rather than simply manage it. Larry Sypowicz of Bellerose, NY, spent more than 20 years looking for a cure or medication that didn’t leave him tired or depressed.

Dr. Bernstein changed Mr. Sypowicz’ life by not only prescribing one of these drugs, but by helping him procure grants and financial aid that allowed him to receive the new drug his insurance wouldn’t pay for. “Within seven months, I was declared Hep C free,” Mr. Sypowicz said. “I feel great. Life is beautiful.”

“This center makes a tremendous difference in the way we treat our patients living with liver disease,” Dr. Bernstein said. “We are so grateful to Ms. Bass for the support she has shown us through the years.”

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The Clifford and Randi Lane Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit at its current location at North Shore University Hospital.

A grateful patient funds a needed expansion for neurocritical care

At eight years old, Clifford Lane was hit by a car while riding his bike and as a result was in a coma. Now he’s giving back to North Shore University Hospital — the place that saved his life — to help meet demand and enhance outcomes for patients with neurologic conditions.

Mr. Lane and his wife, Randi, made a multimillion-dollar commitment to name the Clifford and Randi Lane Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit at North Shore University Hospital. Their gift will relocate the unit to the new Advanced Surgical Pavilion and increase capacity from 16 to 22 beds. The expansion will also include private consultation space for doctors and families.

“Clifford and Randi Lane’s generosity is helping us meet the needs of our patients requiring neurocritical care — an area of medicine where we see one of the nation’s highest patient volumes,” said Michael Dowling, president and CEO, Northwell Health.

Neurological patients have a variety of conditions and surgical needs, including brain aneurysms, brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, seizures, skull base surgery and spine surgery. The unit is also home to the Electronic Neuro Intensive Care Unit (eNeuro-ICU), which provides regionalized neurocritical care for seven Northwell hospitals through video monitoring technology.

“It is through a strict adherence to quality, patient-focused outcomes and innovative research that make this a program of choice nationally,” said Dr. Richard Temes, director of the Center for Neurocritical Care and the Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit at North Shore University Hospital. “Supporters like Clifford and Randi Lane help us to meet the growing needs of our region and ensure that we continue to provide around-the-clock care and the best possible outcomes for our patients and their families.”